Anilingus: Is It Safe?

Despite the reputation of an illicit sexual act, anilingus is a sexual routine enjoyed by lots of couples around the world. The practice of anilingus is becoming more acceptable nowadays, yet it is still considered a taboo subject in some societies, in the literature, and in mainstream sexual health education.

The first book the word anilingus appeared in was Psychopathia Sexualis by an Austro–German psychiatrist and sexologist Richard von Krafft-Ebing. His work was published in 1886, a time many consider to be a wholesome and naïve time for sexual culture. As the act of arousal by stimulating the anus with the tongue or lips, anilingus has been around for centuries by the time Europeans finally admitted it and gave the practice a proper English name.

Sexy-Kiss-Under-Butt-TattooAs with any sexual activity, anilingus can pose dangers to your health and the health of your partner if not performed safely and properly. Just like with unprotected vaginal or oral sex, anilingus can run the risk of HIV infection as well as other sexually transmitted diseases. This being said, anilingus has a very low risk for getting an STD unless you or your partner have bleeding gums, hemorrhoids, and open sores either in the mouth or anus. However, even though the risks of contracting an STD are lower with anilingus, participants do run the risk of possibly contracting Hepatitis A and E. Coli, as both are transmitted through this kind of sexual activity. So how to make anilingus a safe act?

Just as with any sexual practice, the first step is knowing the HIV and STD status of your partner. However, it is hardly attainable to know for sure whether your partner has an STD or not. As such, perhaps the best known way to avoid the dangers associated with anilingus is by using a dental dam, which is deemed the safest form of protection when it comes to cunilingus and anilingus. Some also prefer using an enema to clean out the anus before anilingus to better protect against E. Coli or Hepatitis A transmission. It is a really good preventive measure; however, an enema will lower the danger of infection, but will not completely eliminate the risk of transmission.

The bottom line is that anilingus shouldn't be treated differently from other types of sex. You should use protection while engaging in any sexual act and anilingus is not an exception. Only by understanding all potential dangers and taking the adequate preventive measures, you can enjoy anilingus safely.

Alexandr Sedishev